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Game Trading Website Donates to Wounded Soldiers

A Soldier Carrying His PeerGoozex, a peer-to-peer video game trading company, has asked for the generosity of its members in helping donate games and DVDs to wounded American soldiers. In a partnership with Comfort for America's Uniformed Services (CAUSE), this drive will raise funds to provide entertainment products for young men and women who have returned from war with serious injuries.

Five military hospitals have wish lists with Amazon.com, which are available through Goozex. These wish lists are compiled by CAUSE volunteers in the various military hospitals and are based on the preferences and wishes of recovering soldiers. Read More...

"In difficult economic and global times like these, we feel it is our responsibility to leverage our large gaming community for something worthwhile," said Mark Nebesky, co-founder of Goozex.com, in a news release.

“Every soldier's service in the military is unique and what CAUSE is doing to care for our wounded is amazing, and easy to support. For the troops wounded in battle, this collection of small thank you's sends one large message of gratitude. On behalf of the Goozex team and our membership base, we are very proud to be able to give back to those who give so much,” added Nebesky.

Donations will be made to the following medical facilities:

San Diego Naval Medical Center (Balboa), San Diego, CA
Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, TX
Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, Germany
Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, Ft. Hood, TX

Donations will be collected until February 1, 2009, through Paypal or cheque. Goozex hopes to meet 100% of demands on hospital wish lists. All outstanding donations will be provided directly to CAUSE. To learn more visit Goozex here.

CAUSE’s recreation and entertainment programs reach thousands of injured service men and women facing months of medical care and rehabilitation far from home and family. Bringing a bit of relaxation and fun into what are, for many, very challenging circumstances, these programs also help wounded soldiers reintroduce themselves to their homes and communities as they take their long journey back to health.